Photographs: Eric Piasecki  &  Article: Senem Peace

A valley of chateaus, Loire Valley, is also a home for Chateau du Grand-Luce. 18th century chateau, were a ruin, since award winning designer Timothy Corrigan saw it for the first time in 2002. In 2 years, he bought the chateau and started the renovation, which took about 5 years.

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Chateau du Grand-Luce’s authentic Gallic flavour, is mixed up with relaxed coutry life. The chateau, both has the French architectural essence and Corrigan’s life style.

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The chateau was originally built in 1764. It was created by engineer Mathieu de Bayeux for Jacques Pineau de Viennay, Baron de Lucé. It is a typical French mansion, in a big French garden. And it is magnificent. Corrigan says, he extended the formal parterres at each end to give the garden more lawn and less gravel. The garden descends to lower levels, each one decreasing in level of formality.

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In all the spaces, Corrigan mostly focused on comfort and informality. He used a shade of green, as in Grand Salon, which also was used at the time of the chateau’s construction, and a warmer gold on the pilasters and other architectural details. While doing this, he bring the outdoors and sun to interiors.

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In the entry part of the chateau, the feeling of a traditional French country house is obvious, with the antler trophies, which Corrigan purchased at an auction.

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In Chambre de Lucé, the largest of the guest rooms, Corrigan prefered blue tones in colour with some shades of grey. Portugese needlework rug, upholstered in Manuel Canovas “Louis” in turquoise sofa from George Smith, 18th century Venetian Commode, Pratesi bedlinens and armchair in Schumacher “Ground Cloth III” used in the room.

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In the Salon Chinois, neoclassical paneling borders, 18th-century painted-canvas scenes, red sofas upholstered in Schumacher chatham mohair velvet are the first details that catch your eyes. The name of this space comes from the room’s radiant 18th-century murals, painted by Jean-Baptiste Pillement, who conjured a Western fantasy of Chinese life.

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